Immune Globulin Intramuscular in Pregnancy and Breastfeeding

Risk Factor: CM
Class: Serums, toxoids, and vaccines / Serums

Contents of this page:
Fetal Risk Summary
Breast Feeding Summary
References
Questions and Answers

Fetal Risk Summary

Immune globulin IM (IGIM) is a solution of immunoglobulin, primarily immunoglobulin G, prepared from pooled plasma, that takes 25 days to obtain adequate serum levels (1). It is indicated for postexposure prophylaxis of hepatitis A and measles (rubeola), and in the prevention of serious infections in patients with immunoglobulin deficiencies. In cases of rubella exposure of the pregnant woman, IGIM, 0.55 mL/kg, administered as soon as possible after exposure may prevent or modify maternal infection, but there is no evidence that it will prevent fetal infection (2). However, its use in such cases may be of benefit in women who will not consider therapeutic abortion (2).

The American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists Technical Bulletin No. 160 recommends the use of IGIM for postexposure prophylaxis of hepatitis A and measles (rubeola) (3). No risk to the fetus from this therapy has been reported (3).

Breast Feeding Summary

No data are available.

References

  1. Product information. Gammar. Armour Pharmaceutical Co., 1993.
  2. American Academy of Pediatrics and the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Guidelines for Perinatal Care. 3rd Ed. Elk Grove Village, IL:American Academy of Pediatrics, and Washington, DC:American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists, 1992:129.
  3. American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists. Immunization during pregnancy. Technical Bulletin. No. 160, October 1991.

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